1. #16
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    LLLGuapo, looking very cool, i would love to see some of the work that came out of zbrush. the lion looks great, very strong forms.
    lemonnado, looking good, yah alloys are getting expensive, as an alternative, you could cast them using a resin and metal powder mix, they still patina because of the real alloys in them but you use alot less material and it all cold cast, so your mold will last, and some burnish up very well.

    i wanted to add that some new 3d printers can swap out there
    resin for refractory material so you can print the negitive and pour directly into
    the pc off the table, if you set it up right you could have it produce the negitive for your pour spouts, spruse, cores and pegs to suspend them in the shell of refractory, i love whare the technology is going.
    Last edited by threetails; 05-23-08 at 11:21 AM.

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  2. #17
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    interesting stuff

  3. #18
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    lemonnado...metal prices, metal prices...they are killin' me! Cool to see your cowboy in aluminum. Plastic prints are great but metal is forever. Zbrush design of real world sculpture...I think you will see sculpture designed in ZB more and more. Threetails...site is great, love what you're doing. Try millwizard (Delcam) for three axis .stl work...fast and effective (compared to stl slicer). Here is another piece in progress. Designed in ZBrush, Rhino. Drooling fish fountain...6'H, 250lbs.

    coel01.jpg fish01.jpg fish_foam.jpg fish_metal.jpg

  4. #19
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    Awesome! And thanks for the double wall inspiration..... To bad that AL welds so badly (at least with my equipment). I got a new set of filler rods for my oxy acetylene rig. Lower temp... that should work. Then I can start working in sections as well. With a gallon of molten AL I will come MUCH further than solid casts. Can't wait to try that out. Also check out Vectric's cut3d. Works rather well.

    Very cool fountains!
    Lemo

  5. #20
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    Default 5 axis machining

    Hello to all who are posting to this thread,

    I was directed to this forum as I have a 5 axis router and am also using Zbrush.
    My company is located on the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia and we are mainly involved in doing animatronic animals and creatures for film.

    For the past 5 years we have been using a 5 axis router to help create some of the larger creatures we were asked to make. At this stage I am very new to Zbrush and am only using it to help cleanup laser scans of traditionally sculpted maquettes and to insert perfect spheres for eyeballs.

    The technique we have been using very successfully for the past 2 years blending many technologies together is this.

    We sculpt the maquette in plasticene ( this will probably be done in Zbrush once I am competent enough) then use a laser scanner to convert it to digital info. The resulting stl. or obj files are cleaned up or altered using, Zbrush, Rhino, 3D studio max, Mayka or Stenza - depending on what has to happen next.
    The file is split up in Mayka and we tell the 5 axis router to cut 3mm deeper all over the polystyrofoam sculpt. We then pour melted Chavant clay over the sculpted polystyrofoam to a thickness of about 5mm. Once the clay has cooled- usually 5 hours- we then put the poly back on the machine bed and recut only this time at the correct size. This gives us an extremely accurate clay surface to begin final detailing onto. Chavant clay is REALLY firm, some would say hard, and it is also very abrasive on the machine tools, but it works a treat.
    I have video of the entire process on my website if anyone would like to see how we make these creatures. Here's the link

    http://www.johncox.net/5-axis-video.php

    There's dinosaurs, polar bears, a 15ft tall Thark and speed racer's Mach 5. All done with this technique.
    The mutant fish monster from 'The Host', seen below, was done by adding plasticene onto an undercut sculpt, it was way too complicated to do any other way.
    The Mach 5 was cut in poly but we used an epoxy sculpting medium as the final surface that was cut. It needed to be very sharp on all of the lines along the body and this was the only way to achieve this. The epoxy doesn't attack the poly.
    Also attached are a couple of photos but there are way more on the website.
    Any questions just ask.

    I'd have to say I agree wholeheartedly with threetails summation of sculpting, moulding and casting. I avoid hardcoat over the foam sculpt at all costs and always try and talk the client into a mould and cast approach. It costs more, takes more time but is a far superior result in both finish and longevity.

    John

    Tars-with-legs-12.jpg
    P9155138.jpg
    car-stage-3-1web.jpg

  6. #21
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    Faint!
    Lemo

  7. #22
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    2 words.

    Holy crap....

  8. #23
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    John- Oh man...this is fantastic. What a dream it would be to be working on this kind of stuff.
    Thanks for sharing.

  9. #24
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    johncox85, Thanks for being so forthcoming with the process info. I use almost the same workflow at my shop for sculpture enlargement. I only have a 4 axis carver, so am limited in that capacity. For normal enlargement, we use a laser scanner to capture and Rhino for cutting and layout. I was looking into Mayka for awhile, but did not find it useful without a 5axis router in the shop.

    Lately, we have been using zbrush fairly extensively for digital maquette creation staight out to the machine. It can't be beat. Laser scanners are great, but nothing's better than a nice clean digital model. Also, people tend to sculpt small much different than at scale (large head syndrome). Zbrush really allows you to get in there and get it right.

    I think it is great that you are carving the clay on your cnc for final finish. I want to try this but am unsure if it would be useful to me. Artists tend to want to move the clay around on the enlargements and I am sure that the hard clay would make this impossible for them. In house creations or my own work is another matter...I plan on using the technique for sure.

    Application of CAD tech to traditional sculpting adds a very powerful tool to the sculptor's box. www.metalphysic.com

  10. #25
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    That Thark is awesome!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  11. #26
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    Wow. thats amazing. I have to post something to this thread so I can get email and not lose track of it. I need to read more of it as later. Thanks for the demonstration.
    Alonzo Von Threet
    Zbrusher OSX

  12. #27
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    Default Gr8

    Hi John, you have a very interesting job, pity I live in a 3 world country, as this seems to hi tech for us...

    What 5 axis machine do you use, as i would love to look into this possibility, maybe our country Namibia is not to small...?

    have watched you video, you should do a full tutorial and produce it on DVD, I'll be your first client...

    Keep up the good work..

    Ziggy

  13. #28
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    Default Australia

    Hi Ziggy,

    I was in South Africa in 2004 filming 'Racing Stripes'. Namibia wasn't too far away. See attached photo of me with 2 animatronic animals we created for the film shot in Kwa Zulu Natal in South Africa.

    I have a Thermwood 5 axis machine. Look into the software to use, Mayka is a very,very good programme to use. Patrick Thorn and Company in the UK distribute it. The table size is 10ft long, 5ft wide and z axis(depth) 900mm. The z axis is the one that costs the money, afford the deepest z axis you can.

    The Thermwood uses a Siemens based code to operate but you need another piece of software to calculate your cutting paths.This is where Mayka is the secret weapon as it sees forms rather than the normal CAD way of looking at things.

    When we have an object to cut it will be in stl format.
    Mayka opens this file and shows us the 3D image. We then have to decide how to cut this shape up so that the machine can do its job. I'll post some jpegs tomorrow. Once we have segmented the object into pieces we then have to calculate cutting paths using 3,4,or 5 axis to get the finished pieces. The Thark for example was cut in the following pieces front of head, back of head, front of body, back of body, front top right leg, back top right leg, front top left leg, back top left leg, same for lower leg and same for all 4 arms. So it takes a lot of pieces to make a whole. Each object is different depending on its size and shape. Once the pieces are machined they are then hot wire cut off the remainder of the block of poly and glued together. It is a big 3D jigsaw puzzle in which all pieces fit together perfectly.

    Any other questions just ask.

    John

    John & Stripes web.jpg

  14. #29
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    Default Thx

    Hi John, Thanks for the quick response, and its good to see you've been in our part of the world...

    John this process could probably used with a Prototype machine and Mayka for smaller scale projects, eg. the slicing of the model and later assemblying, as the ABS Plastic machines are limited to size and I would be using it more for art than anything else....

    Just subscribed to your newsletter and have been on your site, what a line of work, something I've always dreamed of....

    Enjoy...

    Ziggy

  15. #30

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    This has got to be the most international zbrush thread. Who knew that CNCing could bring the world together like this Here is some more silo to zb to cast bronze.


    fox_and_crane.jpg Foxandcrane-002.jpg

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