1. #16

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    If you want to learn anatomy without learning to draw, I would suggest making your next major project a full-body anatomical model. This lets you really just focus on learning the anatomy itself, without being distracted by any artistic urges or "stylization".

    Start with the bones, use an anatomy book for reference, and sculpt them all up. Import reference images images into zbrush as needed and work hard until they all are right. From there, add your muscles one by one and learn how they connect to the bones. It should probably take you between two weeks and a month if you set aside a couple hours a day to work on it.

    When you're done, switch to the other gender, and do another one! You'll find you can re-use a lot of your work by deforming the model, but you'll need to re-do some things completely (especially in the hip area). This one will go way faster.

    If you still want to learn more, move on to something like a bodybuilder, a child, or a horse, or something else new, and do the whole thing again.

    It will be tedious, time consuming, and difficult to stick with, but this is the best way to really learn what's going on.

    For reference materials:

    • "Artistic Anatomy" by Sarah Simblet. It has great drawings and photography, and is focused on those parts of anatomy that matter for a visual artist. http://amzn.com/078948045X
    • "Anatomy for the Artist" by Paul Richer. A much more technical study of anatomy, focusing on the detailed interaction of bones and muscles. http://amzn.com/0823002977
    • For technique in Zbrush, this short video by Ryan Kingslien shows you how to quickly create muscles using CurveTubes. You can probably see how a similar technique would work well for roughing in long bones. http://www.isculptstuff.com/2012/08/...our-model.html
    • "Sculpting Realistic Game Characters" by Ryan Kingslien is a good one for later. It's better if you already have the basics down, and helps you organize your knowledge and internalize it. http://amzn.com/047087256X


    So yeah. That's my advice.

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by artfulshrapnel View Post
    If you want to learn anatomy without learning to draw, I would suggest making your next major project a full-body anatomical model. This lets you really just focus on learning the anatomy itself, without being distracted by any artistic urges or "stylization".

    Start with the bones, use an anatomy book for reference, and sculpt them all up. Import reference images images into zbrush as needed and work hard until they all are right. From there, add your muscles one by one and learn how they connect to the bones. It should probably take you between two weeks and a month if you set aside a couple hours a day to work on it.

    When you're done, switch to the other gender, and do another one! You'll find you can re-use a lot of your work by deforming the model, but you'll need to re-do some things completely (especially in the hip area). This one will go way faster.

    If you still want to learn more, move on to something like a bodybuilder, a child, or a horse, or something else new, and do the whole thing again.

    It will be tedious, time consuming, and difficult to stick with, but this is the best way to really learn what's going on.

    For reference materials:

    • "Artistic Anatomy" by Sarah Simblet. It has great drawings and photography, and is focused on those parts of anatomy that matter for a visual artist. http://amzn.com/078948045X
    • "Anatomy for the Artist" by Paul Richer. A much more technical study of anatomy, focusing on the detailed interaction of bones and muscles. http://amzn.com/0823002977
    • For technique in Zbrush, this short video by Ryan Kingslien shows you how to quickly create muscles using CurveTubes. You can probably see how a similar technique would work well for roughing in long bones. http://www.isculptstuff.com/2012/08/...our-model.html
    • "Sculpting Realistic Game Characters" by Ryan Kingslien is a good one for later. It's better if you already have the basics down, and helps you organize your knowledge and internalize it. http://amzn.com/047087256X


    So yeah. That's my advice.
    Thanks man, yes to be honest with you i hate hate hate drawing, i don't why, but id on't see any fun or enjoyment from that, no matter what people told me that will help me a lot, i don't want to draw. Does without drawing, i can be good enough to work in big studios like ILM or Blizzard? I have reference dl from 3D sk, and many from googling around.

    Yea my plan is to start from skeleton, and go to muscles and skin.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BojanStankovski View Post
    Thanks man, yes to be honest with you i hate hate hate drawing, i don't why, but id on't see any fun or enjoyment from that, no matter what people told me that will help me a lot, i don't want to draw. Does without drawing, i can be good enough to work in big studios like ILM or Blizzard? I have reference dl from 3D sk, and many from googling around.

    Yea my plan is to start from skeleton, and go to muscles and skin.
    ILM ,Blizzard and here I was worried about you not being ambitious enough

    Forget about the drawing ,let it go .Just never tell anyone you can not draw or hate it.

    Just get real good at what you like to do.

  4. #19
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    Default L'Ecorche?

    Hi,
    Sorry to pimp out my own app, but with the expertise of Scott Eaton behind this it is a great way to learn.
    thanks
    MD
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lecor...6024?mt=8&ls=1

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdzb View Post
    Hi,
    Sorry to pimp out my own app, but with the expertise of Scott Eaton behind this it is a great way to learn.
    thanks
    MD
    http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lecor...6024?mt=8&ls=1

    How to run this on Win7?

  6. #21
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    Easy, start explorer (or the web browser of choice) and go to www.apple.com. Then buy an iPad.

    Sorry,couldn't resist. I would imagine you can't.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Robb View Post
    Easy, start explorer (or the web browser of choice) and go to www.apple.com. Then buy an iPad.

    Sorry,couldn't resist. I would imagine you can't.
    Now ,now ,Gordon be a good patient and take your Meds .

  8. #23
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    Default Windows coming soon

    Hi,
    A Windows version will be coming soon. Next up Mac desktop then Android. I hope to have a Windows version by the end of the year.
    thanks for looking
    MD
    Quote Originally Posted by BojanStankovski View Post
    How to run this on Win7?

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdzb View Post
    Hi,
    A Windows version will be coming soon. Next up Mac desktop then Android. I hope to have a Windows version by the end of the year.
    thanks for looking
    MD

    Thanks, please give me PM when it's done

  10. #25
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    I suggest to take Scott Eaton's Anatomy for Artists course as a foundation to the whole stuff, and then take the Digital Figure Sculpting course. Not cheap, but worth every single penny you spend. I took the first and I'm attending to the second now, and it's groundbreaking stuff. You might learn some from looking at images at anatomy sites, etc. but it's nothing close to when there is somebody who can tell what you see under the skin, how it works, how it deforms when you move your body, etc.
    Cheers,


    Szabolcs Matefy "Jester"

    Senior Character Artist
    Crytek Budapest

    Certified Softimage Trainer

  11. #26
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jester View Post
    I suggest to take Scott Eaton's Anatomy for Artists course as a foundation to the whole stuff, and then take the Digital Figure Sculpting course. Not cheap, but worth every single penny you spend. I took the first and I'm attending to the second now, and it's groundbreaking stuff. You might learn some from looking at images at anatomy sites, etc. but it's nothing close to when there is somebody who can tell what you see under the skin, how it works, how it deforms when you move your body, etc.
    Hello.

    I am currently on Scott Eatons Anatomy for Artist class at the moment, and this will give anyone a good foundation for drawing, or sculpting. Iv been studying anatomy for some years now, and I'm still learning plenty, so if you really want to get to grips with anatomy and save some time, this is one course to consider. Your need a good few hours a day spare to get the most from it. It is not the inexpensive option, but you realy do get what you pay for, books and DVDs are much harder, long term work.


    Iv also been on Zack Petroc Master class recently for Rhythm's and Gestures of the human form. I found this a very good class to attend, and for anyone who wants to add life to their sculpts, and understand how to define a characters back story, this is the one id recommend. Once you have some good foundations in place for anatomy this would be a good course to take next.

    In either case your still need to do some home work of your own with books such as mentioned in this thread already.

    Daniel.

  12. #27
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    Even though you are not into drawing

    i highly recommend Andrew Loomis "Drawing the Head and Hands"
    actually all his books are amazing and they have all been recently re-printed
    The head and hands one breaks the head down into 3D shapes which easily
    translate to Zbrush

    also Ron Lemen has a course on the Riley extraction method that breaks the head into the various planes
    Villipu is another good teacher for breaking down the head

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